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Federer from a Fan’s Perspective

Federer vs Zverev
Federer is arguably the best of all time, and he has gathered quite a following since arriving onto the scene.

Roger Federer has dominated the men’s tennis game for a long time, capturing the attention of millions while doing so. What does Federer mean to us? Each of us will share our opinion on the significance of the G.O.A.T. below.

Luca: Roger Federer, arguably the greatest tennis player of all time is more than just that. He is a legend of the game, a revolutionary, a leading force in the game of men’s tennis. Federer is not just a tennis player; he is an idol.

My friends laugh when I call Federer a god, but in some ways he is exactly that. He is the best tennis player who has ever lived. It pains me to see him lose, so much so that I’ve been reduced to tears too many times. Each backhand shank is like a sting, each double fault a stab, each loss a heartbreak. One cannot simply enjoy Federer’s game. They are mesmerized, enraptured by this impossibility of shot-making, the grace with which the Swiss moves on the court. Federer is not a tennis player; for so many of us, he is the reason we watch tennis, the reason we enjoy what otherwise can be a dull three-hours of our time.

Federer is an icon, not just in the tennis world, but in the sporting community as a whole. We are witnessing the greatest art that has ever existed. How could Federer make such a grueling sport appear so simple, so effortless? As David Foster Wallace put it, these “Federer Moments” are what make Federer so great. The tweener to set up match point, the outrageous shot-making, the perfectly placed winners are what make Federer the G.O.A.T.

Nadal and Djokovic may have amassed a following of their own, but one cannot help but smile when watching Federer play. No matter who you support; no one hates the Fed.

Fawwaz: Unlike other tennis players, it is not Roger Federer’s athleticism that distinguishes him; rather, it is the suave fashion in which he dominates that compels many to call him the greatest.

The beginnings of my support for Federer go back to when I was about 5 years of age. My father had just recently started teaching me tennis and I began to love the sport unconditionally. I remember walking to a room in our house where my father was watching what I thought was just your average tennis match. Pointing to Federer, my father asked me, “Do you know who this man is?” Obviously, I didn’t have a clue at the time. He told me, “This is Roger Federer and he’s my favorite tennis player.”

Federer wasn’t just a tennis player to me; he was my role model for tennis. From his stylish bandana to his one-handed backhand, I tried to model his each and every move. Sure, those were just phases I had, but it proves how much he truly meant.

Whether it’s his highs and lows or his sobs and smiles, I’ve seen it all. I’ve seen him struggle to succeed some years and then magically dominate the next. I’ve seen him lose matches that he shouldn’t have but then fight in another one to the end. I’ve even seen him beat the record, the almighty record of tennis, the record for most major titles of all-time.

Even today, I am still a fan of Federer. In fact, I will always remember the legacy he had on tennis; the way he changed the sport. And I hope one day, when I have kids, after the Maestro has retired, I can tell them “This is Roger Federer and he’s my favorite tennis player ever.”

Travis:

Even though I prefer to remain un-biased on most subjects, there’s no denying Federer is a legend. He has spent 302 weeks at the number one spot. That’s almost six years! Consecutively, he’s been at number one for a whole four years! Federer is also one of eight men to have won a Career Grand Slam. The records go on but the reason I idolize Federer so much is not only because of statistics.

When I was eight, my mom sat me in front of the television to watch a tennis match between Roger Federer and Marcos Baghdatis. As soon as I saw Federer, I couldn’t take my eyes off of the screen. His elegance, the way he moved on the court–I was in love with it. From then on, he was one of my favorite players to watch and when I saw him win the Australian Open, a nostalgia overcame me. To this day, I cheer for him at any tournament but that doesn’t mean I don’t support Rafael Nadal!

 

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Fawwaz Malki
Writer for Courtside Watch and Space City Scoop. Enjoys writing about sports and also loves Federer.
http://www.courtsidewatch.com

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